performance

bonnie jones - and if i live a thousand lives i hope to remember one

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And if I live a thousand lives I hope to remember one was produced by Bonnie Jones in 2015 and originally commissioned for EVENING WILL COME: A MONTHLY JOURNAL OF POETICS (THE ART OF LOSING—ISSUE 58, curated by John Melillo and Johanna Skibsrud. 

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Bonnie says: 

This piece uses 6-minute looping cassette tapes that I've been incorporating into my live concert performance set up. I usually create feedback and different playback by pressing on all the keys of the cassette player. Because I'm pressing all of the different keys, including record and stop and forward, the cassette actually starts to pick up some of the concert that's happening, so oftentimes on a cassette I'll start to hear the other musicians or little fragments of other players that are in the set with me. Over the course of several years of using the same cassette player and the same cassette tape, the record of the recording turns out to be this kind of palimpsested recording; multiple layers of different performances over several years. The final result that you hear is actually multiple concerts where I've recorded and re-recorded over this one 6-minute loop of cassette tape.

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Constellations says:

More than others we've played, Bonnie's piece is grounded in the process of its creation and its physicality. Working her worn out tape reel till it glitches and moans, Bonnie's work speaks to memory, ghosts, and chance. 

This piece does a magic thing of infusing a recording with the nowness of live music; it is as much a happening as the musical performances that were its building blocks, with the failure of the recording technology as performer and conductor.

In a percussive wave of otherworldly sighs and stutters, the richly textured sound leaves us guessing, with memorable sonic moments passing before can fully process them, so that when they stay longer than expected we are moved and curious - but the tape rolls on.

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Bonnie Jones is a Korean-American improvising musician, poet, and performer working with electronic sound and text. She performs solo and in numerous collaborative music, film, and visual art projects. at institutions in the US, Mexico, Europe and Asia, including the LA MOCA, Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, and REDCAT. Her collaborative sound works have been shown at the Swiss Institute, Whitney Museum, and Hunter College. Bonnie was a 2018 recipient of the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists Award. Born in 1977 in South Korea she was raised on a dairy farm in New Jersey, and currently resides in Baltimore, Maryland.

aleksandra bragoszewska - coarse & janky

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Coarse & Janky was recorded & produced by Aleksandra Bragoszewska and is part of radio project that has been collecting dust for some years now. The extract featured here is pulled from one of four radio ballads to the Bread and Puppet Theatre; Coarse & Janky, Working the Clay, Monsters & Men in Suits, and Possibilitarian Meaning Making, the latter three which have yet to be made.

It features excerpts of the "Why Cheap Art Manifesto" by Peter Schumann (1984) as well as interviews and sounds from: Peter Hamburger, Massimo Schuster, Maryann Incoronata, Peter Schumann, Gregory Corbino, Tuesday night Shape Note Singers, Genevieve the Apprentice, Trudy Cohen, thrushes singing at dusk in the pine forest, Daniel MacNamara, Maura Gahn, the Bread and Puppet Band, Pepe Hilfrau on lip-whistle, Jason Hicks on porch-side banjo, and Highway 122 in Glover Vermont. It was recorded at Bread and Puppet Theatre in Glover, Vermont 2010-2016.

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Aleks says: 

Bread and Puppet Theatre is a 50-year-old self-sustaining radical political puppetry theatre under the artistic direction of Peter Schumann. It has a long history of making street theatre, radical puppet shows, and working with newcomers from far and wide to create shows. This is one of my radio ballads to the theatre, concerning the ramshackle esthetic characteristic of the theatre and its philosophical implications for show making. Presenting the audio in this way is my attempt to collect the vibrant sing- song chaos of the place and pleat it into a radio piece that would sound true to the Beast that is Bread and Puppet.

What's inspiring her these days:

The harmonics of old city apartments as heard underwater in the bathtub.

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Constellations says:

As this roller coaster of a year comes to a close, we thought this sonic manifesto and portrait was the perfect toast for ushering in the new year: To taking artistic risks! To having the courage to struggle on stage!  This piece, and the collaborative, political and tactile world of Bread and Puppet that it conjures, embody the ethos of experimentalism, interdisciplinarity, and community that Constellations aspires to. And we can't think of a voice more suited to sewing this cardboard cacophony together than Aleks'. 

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Aleksandra Bragoszewska is a puppeteer and an apprentice of storytelling. She sharpened her radio teeth with sound and storytelling experiments at CFRC 101.9fm Queens Radio in Kingston, Ontario, but they have grown dull since she apprenticed puppetry under the Bread and Puppet theatre in Glover, Vermont. She makes puppet shows with her independent company, Birdbone Theatre, and studies storytelling under Stephen Jenkinson, in Deacon, Ontario. 

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